Cut off from the World (oW)

Apologies for the non-posting recently; this is because of two things. Firstly, the company that provided my internet managed to completely sever our fiberoptic cable whilst working on next door’s, ensuring my absence for a week. Plus, my WoW time ran out, and  I’m broke for the next week.

Normal service will be restored shortly! :D

Blog Azeroth Shared Topic: Faux Pas’s in WoW

Each week, the folks at Blog Azeroth set up a topic for bloggers to write replies to. This week’s topic is given by Ninevi of Flask Half Empty- go on, give them a visit!

This week’s Shared Topic is this:  Is there anything that you consider a faux pas in WoW; in ‘srs’ gameplay like Raids and Dungeons or just silly things like transmog disasters? Going by the definition below:

A faux pas, noun, \ˈfō-ˌpä, fō-ˈ\ is a violation of accepted social norms (for example, standard customs or etiquette rules).
The term comes originally from French, and literally means “misstep” or “false step”. (via Wikipedia)

Now, there are a few things I would put in this category.

The first: Being a loot ninja. Now this is a faux pas we’ve all seen (or even committed once or twice, accidentally). Someone ‘needs’ an item (regardless of whether they actually need it as an upgrade) for the purposes of vendoring or another cause. Now the rules and definitions of this are tangled somewhat when you think about it; multi-spec characters might use it for their off-spec. Heck, people just might want it because it’s a neat transmog. Therefore, one might say the real faux pas is in the tendency of some players to not communicate with people in a random dungeon group; the ‘ninja’ doesn’t ask if anyone else needs it first.

Second: swearing in the chat box in a PUG dungeon/LFR/battleground. Personally, I can’t think of any reason one might do this (oh, what a goody-goody I am! :P) except to unnecessarily show their frustration. I mean, think about it; Warcraft doesn’t have any built in VOIP (or it didn’t when last I checked) so there’s no ‘accidental’ swearing when you’re on voice activation. You can swear to yourself, sure, but there’s no need to communicate that to all and sundry. I can think of plenty of ways to show frustration in words without expletives.

Third: People who pull everything in sight. I’m talking about that one player who will, contrary to all tactics (and usually, common sense) run into a huge group of mobs whilst poorly suited for a tanking role and/or whilst the rest of the group are fighting the first group. As with the first example, this is pretty crooked in it’s definition; there are plenty of times where one will press a key accidentally and attract another group of baddies, or where the first group forces the players into a second group- the first can be fixed with some crowd control and a quick ‘sorry’ in the chat box, the second is nobody’s fault anyway. But when someone runs into every enemy they find like they’re Saxton Hale then it gets a little ridiculous.

Fourth: Wearing ridiculously ill suited gear for your level and class. Once again, this is a bendable definition (boy do I LOVE those!) in that every so often, you’ll see a somewhat new player who simply doesn’t yet have the knowledge of what is best for their character (heck, we were all there once) and will run around equipping whatever’s new and shiny. This I can excuse, at least between the levels 1-30. However, after these levels, we venture into the area where people should have either found a guild, some friendly advice from players, or a guide from the ‘net that tells them what they should equip. Seeing a hunter equip Intellect gear after level 30 at least (and I’ve seen it!) is nearly inexcusable.

That’s enough from me for now. See you next Thursday for another Shared Topic :D

Meet Team Zodiac: Báiyáng

Báiyáng

Class: Rogue

Temperament: Generally bemused

Status: Alt, DPS

Armory Page

The second member of Team Zodiac. Hailing from the Wandering Isle, Báiyáng demonstrated an uncanny skill with blades from a young age, practicing by throwing kitchen knives at her bedroom wall (only discovered when she gave her father’s beard an accidental parting after putting one through the wall). After the events on the Isle, she moves to Stormwind and joins the Alliance, although she has a dim view of both sides due to their general inability to co-operate other than to save their own hides. Nevertheless, she aids the Alliance as best she can, although she still tries to talk down the occasional orc before having to put a dagger in his back.

Pandas in Stormwind Keep!

“Samuelson! Bring me my boxing gloves!”

Báiyáng walked up the hall towards the throne of Stormwind Keep. She could feel the eyes of the guards assessing her as a possible threat. She wondered why for a brief second; then corrected herself as to where and who she was.

She was a pandaren, and a stranger to this land. For all these guards knew she could be a secret assassin for this ‘Horde’ they kept warbling on about. Obviously she wasn’t- she would have not walked through the room in plain sight if she was- but they still had many reasons to be suspicious.

She stopped at the end of the hall. In front of her was a very large man, wielding a very sharp sword and expression.

In frustration over Ophi’s new Beast Mastery rotation, I decided to take a break tonight and start putting my panda through the grind of 1-90.

Blustering through the Wandering Isle is actually a very nice experience. It’s pretty much a mini-Pandaria, sharing all the architecture and whatnot, and it’s very nice in places. It’s also quite strange to think that you’re on the back of a turtle. The plot is also quite engaging and it fits in well with the mechanics and ‘style’ of the pandaren; at least for me, it raised quite a few questions concerning the Alliance/Horde war, and the pandaren factor within it.

Oh well, back to the story stuff.

After a prod or two from Aysa, Báiyáng came to realise that this large, rather frightening man was in fact Emperor- uh, King Varian Wrynn of the Alliance. She had been surprised about his attitude towards the Horde whilst they walked; they were his enemy, and had done terrible things to him and his kingdom, true. But the way he talked- he almost spat out every word concerning them, as if the words themselves were foul- suggested that he would not, would never consider any true diplomatic reasoning with them.

While she definitely didn’t like the tone of the Horde’s representative back on the Wandering Isle, Báiyáng did not find this particularly appealing either.

And as they came to the garden to the side of the throne room, she was given the chance to show it; he had asked to spar with her. She figured she may have put a tad too much force into the last swing, as the mighty King of Stormwind was knocked on his backside. Oops.

Aysa and Jojo had a look of pure horror on their faces. If this was seen as an affront, their lives were probably forefeit. A great relief then, that the accosted King got up as quickly as he had fell with a look of great happiness.

It’s a shame that, like Kezan and the Lost Isles, The Wandering Isle is an isolated zone unto itself; once you’ve left, you’re not going back. I think this is kind of a waste, really. I mean, it’s a nice zone that’s plenty big; there’s potential there for it to become a nice questing zone if only Blizzard think about it a little. Heck, even if other races aren’t able to, at least let pandas go back every now and then. Nice bit of nostalgia, without having to roll a whole new character just to experience it.

As I said in a post a while back, the Pandaria expansion as a whole raises many questions about the Alliance and Horde’s views of each other. It seems that the war is starting to change people for the worse, especially in the Alliance; Jaina Proudmoore wants revenge for the massacre at Theramore, and let’s not forget the Captain of the Skyfire during the opening moments of the skirmish in the Jade Forest, opening fire on defenseless orcs. It’s all rather unsettling.

The King had taken the sparring match in good humour and had welcomed them to Stormwind. As Báiyáng explored one of the large districts of the city, she pondered the conflict that had brought her here. The King had said that any pandaren who had joined the Horde were now their enemies; and as such should receive no quarter. What a wasteful way to deal with things, she thought. As she found herself in a barber’s salon having a much needed hairdo, she silently resolved that should she find any of these ‘Horde’, she’d try talking to them first.

With a laced dagger behind her back. Just in case.

DZ Friday Top Five: Guns

Welcome to the first DZ Top Five, where I list my personal favorites among various aspects of Azeroth. Since Ophi is a hunter first and foremost, I’m going to cover all things that go boom and put holes in things. Onward- and don’t forget your safety goggles, wouldn’t wan’t to take out an eye. Or both eyes. Eh.

5- Consortium Blaster

Bought from Outland, the Consortium Blaster is a lovely piece of gear. Made to resemble a giant magic revolver, the Blaster features a big scope, a… thing underneath (seriously, what is that? A magazine? An exhaust pipe?) and is topped off with a tiny sun at the back to power it with. The only reason this doesn’t feature higher on my list is because they put a face on the end of the barrel, which (I think) detracts a bit from the overall look.

You can buy the Consortium Blaster from Karaaz in Netherstorm for just under 35 gold (at exalted with the Consortium), or alternatively you can make its poorer brother the Armor-Plated Combat Shotgun at 450 engineering.

4- Widebarrel Flintlock

Take a cannon and a rifle stock and chain’ em together. Light fuse, point at thing to destroy, and  wait for the fireworks. The Widebarrel Flintlock is one of my favorites simply because of its blatant unrealism- try making that in real life and you’ll be killing not just what you point it at, but yourself and any unlucky bystanders as well. Still, if you roll a Horde hunter and you want a truly huge boomstick (stop laughing in the back) go grab one.

You can get this as a drop from Fjola Lightbane in 10-man Trial Of The Crusader, but unfortunately for us Alliance only the Horde can get it. Shame.

3- Core Marksman Rifle

Sometimes you just need to keep it simple. I like this gun because it looks like something you’d put together in your garage using some spare parts and bits from the family car. Plus, it looks quite realistic (well, aside from the obvious). Your mileage may vary, but I know I like it.

You can get the Core Marksman Rifle using Engineering and a recipe off any of the Molten Core bosses. Alternatively, Alliance players can buy the Sawed Off Hand Cannon for just under 47 gold (at revered with Alliance Vanguard) or both factions can get it as the K3 Pachyderm Prevention Device as a quest reward from Ample Inspiration.

2- Wrathfire Hand Cannon

Totally unique and with a hilarious model, the Wrathfire Hand Cannon is something you’d expect Wile E. Coyote to off himself with. I love it for the fact that it’s just awesome to have and shoot- in a similar vein to the Widebarrel Flintlock above, it’s something that has a real sense of power to it.

You can get this wonderful weapon from Grandmaster Vorpil in the Shadow Labyrinth. Why he’d be carrying this about and not using it, I can’t imagine.

1- Wolfslayer Sniper Rifle

A very desirable gun for many players, this gun looks like a cross between a long rifle, a combat shotgun and (true to its name) a sniper rifle. With a rather dark color scheme and an excellent design, it’s like it almost wants to go out and cause damage. It also looks particularly realistic; indeed, were it not for its particular location and it’s unique model, I’d wager we’d see a lot more of these snagged for transmog.

As stated above, the gun is in a rather difficult location; it drops from the Big Bad Wolf in Karazhan. This means not only do you have to fight the RNG to snag the gun, you also have to hope the boss shows up (being, as it is, a random boss encounter). Many times have I smashed through half of Karazhan to find Romeo and Juliet waiting for me instead of sweet firearm goodness. Sigh.

That’s it for this week- Next week we go into the wide world of Swords. See you then! Oh, and do make sure you return your goggles to the attendant outside. :D

(Sha Of) Anger Management

Oh so monochromatically evil!

 

So, I’ve been wanting to go bring down the Sha of Anger with Ophi for the past couple of days, as it’s part of the first phase of my gear up plan; in this case, I was after the Claw of Anger which is a quest-starting item.

After hearthing back to Stormwind (via Dalaran, as is my routine) I was happy to see someone in General forming a raid group to kill the angry lil’ critter. Dutifully, I asked for an invite, got one, and beat a path to the Kun-Lai Summit. I found the rest of the raid members, who were standing in a group and surprisingly organised. We then opened fire.

To say the least, it was chaos. Adds were flying in every which way, along with black clouds and mind controlled players. Being a world boss didn’t help much either; mushan mobs were everywhere (and seemingly thought it was a good idea to run right into the pack of heavily armed, screaming people) and it lasted a good while too thanks to the Sha’s giant health bar. I may be wrong, but I’ve never seen a boss with 300 million health before; it took us a good while to chew through that even with about 25-30 people.

Still, eventually the dust settled, and Ophi was able to claim her Claw as well as a Cache of Sha-Touched Gold (containing a measly 25g) afterwards. She will be wearing her new boots with pride.

Well, at least until she gets her shiny green transmog gear together…

Valor Point Pittances and LFR Lockouts

‘I am a poor, poor hunter.’

One thing I’ve never liked is the LFR system and Valor point cap. Both seem unnecessarily restricted to me.

Now the following words below may seem rather QQ-ish; that’s because they are. Read on only if you can resist the urge to break out the flamethrower.

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